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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
is not a fan of big government, i share many of those worries. i'm asked constantly about the n.s.a. stuff. i don't know enough of what's going on. but i have this guttural reaction where, no, i don't want my data scooped up vs. the analytical counterterrorism side of me saying, i want their data scooped up. there is something to be had there, a conversation to be had there. i just say that, you know, when you have that conversation, you shouldn't let it -- and i don't think you guys do this, but some people i think now are defining the current threat environment and how things are evolving around the globe with the impetus to wrap this up because they want to declare it over and an end to it. s there's a danger that you go too far in your thinking in that and think you're just going to say it's all over with because i don't want to deal with it anymore. the bottom line is our enemy gets a vote. >> we covered a lot of ground. but there's obviously still a lot of ground we could cover. let me thank our two panelists very much. [applause] and thank you all for coming and i hope to to see you ag
begins a week-long family vacation. among the likely topics today, obamacare, the nsa, the terror threat overseas and our bumpy relationship with russia. joining me now for her take on what to expect today is monica crowley, fox news contributor. monica, always good to have you with us here on "happening now." the president, he is facing some questions today from the quote, unquote, news media as opposed to what he did the other night on tuesday with jay leno which is a softer approach. what do you think he is going to face today? >> actually jay leno asked him tougher questions. kelly: good for jay leno. >> sometimes than we see from the white house press corps, right? the president does in press conferences. he runs out the clock and take a question and tends to filibuster. i have a feeling this press conference lasts about an hour which is usually the time frame, he will run out the clock and run out the door to his vacation. i expect he will get a couple questions on nsa. for example he told jay leno earlier this week that the u.s. does not have a domestic spying program yet "the new
on a wide range of issues, including u.s.-russia relations and likely the nsa surveillance programs. indications are that he will make some sort of statement of the top of the news conference and it is likely to be about the nsa. the new york times" says at resident plans to launch new efforts. the president is endorsing a new policy panel to review surveillance powers. independent attorney to argue against the government before the surveillance courts. so some of the things that we're likely to hear but as the resident begins the news conference this afternoon. it will -- as the president begins the news conference this afternoon. after the news conference is done, we plan to open up our phones than hear from you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] afternoon, everybody, please have a seat. over the past few weeks, i have been talking about what i believe should be our priorities for the country. i am focused on the number one responsibility as commander-in- chief, keeping the american people safe. in rece
everything i posted and explanations. so i will talk to you very briefly about the nsa, and that is something i have been very involved with, trying to rein in the out-of-control nature of what is going on right now with our surveillance programs, and that is something that i have spent, as you have probably seen from the news, a lot of time doing over the past couple of months. what the nsa has been doing him as has been declassified now, is collecting the phone records of every single person in the united states, regardless of whether you are under suspicion of anything, so, in other seen from the news, a lot of time doing over the past couple words, the nsa has a database, and they actually collect every time you call someone. they collect the call that was made. they tell you which numbers were connected, the duration of the call, and they keep other sorts of what they call metadata on your calls. they have been doing this for quite some time, but it was recently disclosed, and the problem, of course, is they are doing it without any suspicion. it does not matter if you have a connection
an amendment that would bar the nsa from using funds to collect phone and data records from citizens not subject to an investigation. the amendment which was opposed by house leader john boehner in the white house was defeated by a vote of 205-217. this town hall held in marshall michigan is just over an hour. [applause] >> hello everyone. he is my chief of staff. he doesn't just work for me so if you have questions or concerns here in the district you can always reach ben. he is primarily in my grand rapids office my main district office. you can find that on my web site. we have a satellite office in battle creek so if there is something you would like to schedule or an appointment you would like to schedule contact her grand rapids office so we can make sure we have someone down here to meet with u.s. well in calhoun county. by district director is not here today but he is also a valuable resource. if you want to contact my grand rapids office to reach him please feel free to do so. he is always around except for today but for a good cause he is not here today. but, he is a great
the nsa a is not operating these microphones clearly. [laughter] or maybe barack obama is. that's a good point. it's wonderful to be here tonight. wonderful to be here at the steam boat institute. i think it's long past time that the aspen institute got a doze of truth and reality and facts. [applause] and we're thrilled to be part of that effort here tonight. we thought we would do a cup of things. we want to talk about current events, but the most important current event in our lives in our family has been the fact that my dad was bless -- we were all blessed. my dad was a recipient a of new heart a little over a year ago. [applause] and his story, you know, he talked about his first campaign for office when he was elected, and 1967, when i was running the first time was also the first time he had a heart attack, and i've been going back for reasons you can imagine looking at some old news clippings about political campaigns in wyoming, and came across one where my dad was asked about his heart attack in 1978. after he had the attack and decided he was going stay in the race he was int
i concerns about this technology. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology bit.could be abused a i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are
temporary asylum to nsa leaker and american fugitive edward snowden. that's snowden leaving the airport where he had been holed up for more than a month. the move could derail a scheduled summit meeting between presidents obama and putin. cnn matthew chance following developments for us. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. that's right. absolute fury being expressed by officials in the wraits that russia has made this decision to grant edward snowden a political asylum for at least one year. he walked out of the airport. had been couped up for about a month. you see him walking with his lawyers into relative freedom of russia wra, though it's not clear just how free he will be. at the moment his location is being kept secret. his lawyers say that's because edward snowden himself fears for his own safety. he says he believes u.s. intelligence officers, because of the controversial nature of his position, are chasing him. we also understand from the lawyer of edward snowden as well, the russian lawyer, that is, that he will be living with american sit sfwlenz who are living in the ru
peter king and other people from the intelligence community and the nsa and so forth, people are saying this is the most chatter that we've picked up since 9/1,1 actually since before 9/11. what does that mean? >> i think there are three points that need to be. one, clearly the presidential campaign of barack obama was false in saying that al qaeda was degraded two, the speech in may declaring the war on terror over was wrong. three, after benghazi, they don't want to keep the same mistake to keep americans in harm's way. four, as wes indicated, we've got good intelligence, but this is a tough, difficult business of engaging in this war on terror. the administration is taking the right kind of precautions. but we have to hold our breath and we have show we're not disengaged and that is a pattern that has to change with the u.s. government over the last couple years. >> peter brooks, is the government of pakistan or at least the secret service of pakistan giving al zawahiri all kinds of comfort and help and you think they're giving him resources for his campaign against the united states
to nsa leaker edward snowden. my next guest said it's the right direction but can't undo five years the president spent remaking the image into one perceived around the globe as weak. fox news contributor linda chavez. thanks for joining us this morning. >> great to be with you. >> i think a lot of people voted for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's e
which is the nsa who every three months is going to this fisa court which is a secret court which no one can appeal to. and they're getting warrants to get cell phone records basically every single american, okay? you have an fbi who believes that and has went to court to say that they do not, they don't need, basically they don't need a warrant to put a gps tracking device on your car. you've got an irs whose official position is that they don't need a warrant to check your e-mail. this, of course, is that same irs that has no compunction about using -- abusing their authority. they have targeted tea party groups and so far nobody has really paid a price for that. and so read the situation that i find, i think i'm and i might be the only person who feels it is about nothing is being done to rein in these government agencies. and so from my perspective it's like, well, the only privacy really have is what the government says that you have to. and i was really pumped when you voted against -- that was awesome, i was really happy about that. i was really disappointed that you voted against
of tennessee. she's also chair of the judicial conference of the nsa's committee on the budget, and so is well and deeply first and funding issues faced by the court and can answer i believe many of the implicit questions raised in the opening statement from both myself and senator sessions. judge gibbons, please proceed. >> chairman coons, senator sessions, members of the subcommittee, i appear before you as chair of the judicial conference committee on the budget. the judiciary very much appreciates the invitation to discuss the financial crisis facing the courts. senator coons, i am pleased that judge is a known circuit are here today. i see judge ted mickey. there's the judge from your home state. the third circuit itself -- as rest of the judiciary but it's within the circuit coordination and efforts to address the current crisis has been stellar. i also would like to recognize judge john bates right here behind me, the new director of the administrative office of the court who comes after serving on the d.c. federal district court. the $350 million, 5% across the board sequestration cuts
the relationship, especially in light of what has happened with edward snowden and the nsa that relationship between the foreign spacing components of the american government, and its relationship to owners and operators of critical infrastructure who traditionally operate domestically. >> there are a few trend that are important, underpinnings of your question. first of all, over the last decade, increasingly the department of defense relies on facilities here in the united states in order to operate our forces abroad, and so when you look at the dependence of dod facilities, military bases here, on privately owned infrastructure, especially the electric grid, you can see the imperative for dod to be able to partner effectively, not only with industry to assure the flow of those vital electricity services, but of course also with the department of energy and the department of homeland security, which will always be in the lead for the federal government. never the department of defense force these kinds of issues. so, building industry collaboration under the leadership and the federal team
. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology that could be abused a bit. i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are on the line. i understand your c
of the recent nsa disclosures that we're learning about is, you know, if you don't have members of congress and the u.s., the american people knowing about what the government is doing and the kind of extraordinary power they want to make the country safe, then, you know, you do risk the sense this will just be the kind of permanent war that will never end, and you will never be able to grapple, and that creates a national security bureaucracy. but that said, the idea that you just want to -- you know, if you were to say that we should repeal that aumf, then you would effectively be saying you don't think there currently is a war, and as tom said, the enemy gets a vote, and they're still at war with us. that's kind of where i'm at. >> let me just throw into the discussion, i'm pretty sure president obama suggested before the closing of the diplomatic outposts that the authorization for the use of military force, that congress should consider repealing it. but again, that -- >> or modifying it. >> or modifying it. very different, i guess. the idea of repealing it would be based on the narrat
did not request miranda's detention. greenwald is the reporter who exposed the details of the nsa surveillance program. >>> now to idaho, where authorities are allowing evacuees to return home. miguel is in ketchum, idaho. >> reporter: this is one of the most iconic most historic towns in this region. today because of the work of firefighters it and thousands of homes in this area are safe for now. not far from the heart of idaho's massive inferno, today firefighters are gaining ground, containment lines protect communities in the path of the fire. only one home lost, thousands saved. the "x" factor here, wind. worried flying embers will spread fire, a fleet of 30 aircraft have pounded the fast-moving blaze. the fire fight in the air is just as dangerous as it is on the ground. pilots face thick smoke and stiff winds, but their role in this firefight is critical. the aerial assault protected towns like sun valley but the community is now a ghost town. this man opened his restaurant doors last year but the fire has crippled his business. >> right about now, this time of year, stree
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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